European Journal of Korean Studies – Vol 21.2

1 KEITH HOWARD, SOAS, University of London Dance and Ideology in North Korea: Ch’oe Sŭnghŭi and Her Response to Criticism 31 NUR AISYAH KOTARUMALOS, Seoul National University Asia Center Cross-Cultural Adjustment of Indonesian Expatriates in South Korea 59 PHILLIP SHON, Ontario Tech University A Comparative Synthesis of American and Korean Parricidal MassMurders 83 HASAN TINMAZ,…

Cross-Cultural Adjustment of Indonesian Expatriates in South Korea (31–58)

Abstract This study examines the cross-cultural adjustment of Indonesian expatriates working in South Korea. Specifically, it focuses on Indonesian expatriates’ experiences and ways to adjust to the Korean workplace setting. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with nine Indonesian respondents, this study follows the adaptation model by Milton Bennet and moves beyond the antecedents of cross-cultural… Members…

A Case Study on South Korean Mobile Payment Applications: Samsung Pay vs Kakao Pay (83–110)

Abstract This study describes users’ perceptions regarding Samsung Pay (n=25) and Kakao Pay (n=25), the two popular mobile payment applications in South Korea. The survey included fifteen questions; eleven questions were about general uses and perceptions about mobile payments and the final four questions specifically branched between the payment systems. Overall, South Korean users have…

Interrogating Trot, Situating the Boom: New(tro) Nostalgia, Old Songs, and National Identity Performance (183–226)

Abstract Across 2019–2020 a number of South Korean TV competition shows branded their musical identity as “trot.” This term denotes a perceived genre of popular music considered normative to South Korea’s developmentalist decades and thereafter as the music of older generations, yet the surprise success of the TV shows seemingly indicated a younger uptake heralding…

The Drama in the Sentence: Sequence as a Crucial Challenge for Literary Translation from and to Korean (Page 1-41)

Abstract In translation, carefully-crafted sentences are exposed to myriad dangers. This is because translators tend to prioritize syntactical fidelity at the expense of sequence, that is, the order of elements insofar as this relates to calculated progression, gradual disclosure of information, and cumulative development of meaning. But if sequence is turned around for the sake…