Pages 265-286 – Yunhee Kim – ‘Pro-Japanese Economic Alliance Theories during the Period of the Taehan Empire’

The Sino-Japanese War of 1894–5 brought about the official end of Korea’s status as a vassal of China. Thereafter, the Chosŏn government began increasingly to assert its independence from China. The abolition of the traditional yŏnho system (under which a year was dated by reference to the corresponding year of the reigning Chinese emperor) in…

Pages 211-231 – Vladimir Tikhonov – ‘Fascinating and Dangerous- Japan in Korea’s Enlightenment Thought in the 1900s’

Historical introduction: Meiji Japan and Korean reformists, 1881–1905 Throughout the troubled history of Korea’s post-traditional transformation, Japan has served as an important reference point from the very beginnings of Korea’s opening to the West up to the present. However diverse the meanings which ‘Japan’ as a semantic unit could be charged with, it always played…

Pages 185-210 – Owen Miller – ‘The Myŏnjujŏn- A Silk Merchants’ Guild in Late Chosŏn Korea’

This paper is part of a broader research project attempting to understand the role of commerce in Chosŏn-dynasty Korea, a project that will hopefully contribute something to our general understanding of the position of commerce in pre-capitalist societies. Commerce has clearly played an important role in human societies since long before the rise of capitalism.…

Pages 163-184 – Young Mi Kim – ‘Coalition Theories and the Dynamics of Coalition Party Politics in Japan and the Republic of Korea’

Debates on the causes of coalition (in)stability date back to more than a century ago; coalition governments have at times been referred to as “structurally weak and unstable” (Lowell, 1896), whereas others (Lijphart, 1994; Rokkan, 1970; Sartori, 1976) have repeatedly emphasised that “multi-party coalition systems are not necessarily unstable and ineffective”. Coalition-building has been seen…

Pages 147-161 – Alon Levkowitz – ‘Where is the King Buried? Legitimacy Struggles on the Korean Peninsula’

Since they were established in 1948, the two Koreas have been busy building their internal and external legitimacy. Each of the Koreas, while consolidating its internal regime, has struggled with the other for international recognition as the sole legitimate representative of the Korean peninsula. The legitimacy struggles have lasted for years, changing in complexion in…

Pages 135-145 – Inok Paek – ‘Music of the Fatherland- The North Korean Soundscape in the Construction of Chongryun Identity in Japan’

The kayagŭm zither tradition spread with Korean migration to Japan in recent times, particularly since the early 20th century.1 Since the political division of the Korean peninsula in 1948 and the succeeding Korean War (1950–3), both performance style and repertory have developed independently in South and North Korea, reflecting the somewhat different political and cultural…

Pages 119-134 – Kim Hyun-key Hogarth – ‘Eschatology and Folk Religions in Korean Society’

Eschatology is best represented in practices of various folk ‘religions’ as well as mortuary rituals in Korean society. This paper analyses three of the most important Korean folk ‘religions’, namely shamanism, ancestor worship and geomancy, in relation to the Koreans’ tripartite view of the human soul. Download article | 194.75 KB 3 downloads … Members…

Pages 107-118 – Joanna Elving-hwang – ‘The Improper Desire for Knowledge- De-gendering Curiosity in Contemporary Korean Women’s Literature’

Female curiosity is here discussed in the context of traditional and modern Korean folktales and proverbs, and the ways in which these conceptualise the issue. These traditional ways of perceiving female curiosity are then juxtaposed with the way it is re-imaged in a contemporary feminist fairy tale. The aim of such comparison is to show…